It’s been a few years since I lived in China, but still to this day I crave the food I had on my doorstep while living in Nanjing. And no food filled me with as much joy as baozi.

Baozi are meat or vegetable fillings, wrapped in dough and steamed to perfection. There’s something brilliantly satisfying about them, and although they might seem like an appetizer, they are filling enough to make for a good breakfast or lunch meal on the go.

Here are eight of the best ways to enjoy the steamed, savory bun. I’m off to reminisce about Chinese street food…

Carrot Ginger Pork Baozi

Carrot Ginger Pork Baozi

Check out the recipe here

Practice really does make perfect for the making of baozi. We even have a short video where I demonstrate the technique!

Judy @ The Woks of Life
Chinese Baozi

Chinese Baozi

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It’s pretty fast and simple to make this baozi doughbut make sure that you knead the dough until it becomes elastic and smooth. Also, get a nice fine light low-gluten flour if you want white buns.

Lili @ Lili’s Cakes
Dangerously Tasty Steamed Chinese Baozi Buns

Dangerously Tasty Steamed Chinese Baozi Buns

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As soon as you get your fresh baozi out of the steamer, wait a few seconds, and then take a bite out of it immediately while it’s still piping hot. Eating baozi when it’s hot and fresh, the steam paired with the fluffy soft bread and filling in your mouth, makes all the difference.

Mark @ Migrationology
Chicken Baozi

Chicken Baozi

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best baozi recipes

Vegetable Baozi

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Take the time to practice folding and pleating your baozi, it’s the most difficult part of making them. I learned by watching other people, there are a lot of great instructional videos online that can help you refine your technique.

Summer @ O & O Eats
Nutella Baozi

Nutella Baozi

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A good tip to make baozi as chewy and fluffy as possible is proper kneading, developing that gluten fully. I use my stand mixer for that.

Don’t be shy! I tend to knead it for 15-20 minutes if not longer sometimes.

Also, allowing the dough to properly rest as it ferments away will give gluten enough time to relax. Those long gluten strands create the chewy fluffy texture everybody loves. Also, make sure the steamer is fully going before placing the raw buns in it. That would give them the proper spring to fluff up. Have fun!

Paul @ That Other Cooking Blog
Steamed Chinese Meat Buns

Steamed Chinese Meat Buns

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Braised Oxtail Baozi

Braised Oxtail Baozi

Check it out here

The method to wrap the baozi may seem daunting, but just practice and do what you can – it’s the taste that matters in the end, of course!

Betty @ le Jus d’Orange

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